You, me, us, we,
Are our differences all we can see?
We’re similar in ways but we’re not the same,
And is that really a flaw, something to blame?


We stress the fact that we’re all counted as equal,
We think like that is true, but we act like that is deceitful.
And tell me this, is one gender greater than the other?
If so, what has your sister done to be better than your brother?

Do you remember when the colour of our skin used to matter?
I say “used to” but have we even moved on from that chapter?
And what about the people that have to live with a disability?
They’re not any less human, so why give out the wrong credibility?

We may think we fit in but we’re all outsiders to someone,
And even if we feel alone, know we’ll never be forgotten.
Social justice is something we’ve been fighting for, for years,
And maybe someday we’ll stop crying and finally have dried tears.

 

“I wrote this poem when I was 15 years old and as strange as this may sound it was God who gave me the desire to write it, as well as the words to write. I didn’t even truly understand what I was writing, I just knew I felt led to write those words so I did. Looking back on this poem, I want to share it with others because it’s a powerful message I want others to reflect on.” – Rutendo

Sandra Reynolds

Sandra Reynolds

Editor at NY Literary Magazine
Sandra earned her B.A. in English. She works part-time as a freelance writer and proofreader. Sandra was born in Massachusetts and currently resides in NYC with her fiance and their adorable pug.
Sandra Reynolds