The NY Literary Magazine

A Distinguished Selection of the Finest Modern Literature

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sad poems about death

There Will Come a Day by Hazel MacMahon

There will come a day when the sun no longer
Shines,
She will have been ripped and scorned
By a force not benign,
The sky will close up with scores
Of infinite grey,
And you will burn with the pain
Of him having passed away,

There will come a day when the leaves no longer
Grow,
They will have been plucked and fallen
Down the darkest hole,
The branches will droop diminished
And you will sacrifice your hope
Of saving his last few minutes,

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Triptych by Lorcan Black

I.

This air is the air of an oven,
it is so deathly hot.

For days the sun has been crisping the microbes.
A boy has disappeared from the village.

2AM and the foothills of the Pyrénées
lit with light flashes between the dark spaces of trees,
foliage on foliage.

Sparks of light glitter the mountain sides.

Up here- mountains before us, village below us-
it’s like an ant farm, lines of lights
following the twists and turns between
row after row of houses

scaling slowly into the mountains
for the third consecutive night.

II.

The day it happened,
we’d walked into the foothills,

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Sister Blue by Brenda Davis Harsham

Brother new, sister blue, I miss you.
Both lost at age four. Pain is evermore.

Is it wrong that I still long to belong?
To share every care and touch your hair?

To pillow fight, fly a kite, hold me tight,
whisper secrets in the dark, swing in the park?

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Flowers, No Son by La’Erica Conner

Just a child,
born into this world,
Pure innocence,
wrapped up inside of him.

No knowledge of how this life works,
Unaware of death,
awaiting his soul to keep.

A hysterical mother,
a bewildered father,
Begging for answers
about the unexpected leave.

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“Your Country Needs You” A Poem with Deep Meaning by Tom Higgins

Once upon a time I saw a poster
Of a general pointing straight at me
And the words below shouted out
That a soldier I should be.

Yes a soldier now that was a thought
I’d never had before
I didn’t fight, I’d never fought
And I’d never been to war.

But myself, and millions of others
Decided to heed the call
And despite the tears of our mothers
We trooped off all proud and tall

Together as mates from our towns
All over these sceptered isles
We left young and happy, but soon frowns
Replaced our naïve smiles.

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